Frank Lloyd’s blog

Art, architecture and the people that I know.

Posts Tagged ‘Henry Hopkins

The Two Californias

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Camp_Bluff_Lake_letter copyI don’t know how many times I’ve made the drive from L.A. to the Bay Area. The number is well over 100, and spans a time period of over 50 years. Even as a child, I was irrationally obsessed with images of San Francisco, and begged my parents to take me there. My family traveled together on the train in August of 1960. We were tourists that first time, and I recorded the vacation in a short essay for my fourth grade class, with what was my very best effort at penmanship.

I’ve just returned from a road trip; this time it was part business and part pleasure. Stops in Oakland, Fairfax and Sebastopol were for gallery duties—picking up and dropping off artworks, and viewing a painting. During the long drive, I had a chance to reflect on my multiple trips, and my relationship to the oft-cited divide between the two regions of California. The divisions of geography, climate, politics, and culture are often the subjects of debate. The controversies and arguments can grow passionate—especially the rivalry between Dodger and Giant fans.

Road_Trip_1 copyBut what I was recalling—the people I know in the world of art—was a different story. It demonstrates how very much interrelated the lives of the artists and the two regions are. Let’s take, for example, the story of our artist Richard Shaw, who was born in Hollywood and lived in Newport Beach before becoming a resident of the quintessential Northern California town of Fairfax. Or consider the history of my friend, the late Henry Hopkins, a UCLA graduate who went on to become the Curator of Exhibitions and Publications at LACMA, before his tenure as Director at SFMOMA, and then his eventual return to the Hammer. Don’t forget about Richard Diebenkorn, whose first shows were in the Bay Area, but produced perhaps his most well-known series of paintings in a studio in Ocean Park, a neighborhood in Santa Monica. Peter Selz, who had a stay in Claremont before going to MOMA as the Chief Curator of Painting, eventually wound up in Berkeley. Peter Voulkos, a Montana native who attended California College of Arts and Crafts for his master’s degree, came to L.A. during the period of 1954 to 1959, then returned to Berkeley.

This list could go on, but the thought persists: Is there really such a division between the two Californias? I think not. Yes, the politics and culture may differ overall, but the people travel freely through some sort of permeable membrane. I have lived and worked in both the North and South, and so have many of my friends. Though I must be clear about one thing: I’m still a Dodger fan.

Dinner Time

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Dinner Group copy
Over the years, my gallery has taken on all sorts of guises, from exhibition space to lecture hall. But perhaps its most elegant makeover is when it becomes a private dining room. We’ve put together the menu, gone over the guest lists, and had the catering company plan the meal for dinners from 20 to 100 people. It’s a great way to get friends of the artists and the gallery’s supporters to gather in the space with the art.
Billy Al Bengston and Peter Voulkos copy

The largest of these dinners was held in 2000, on the occasion of the Peter Voulkos show of bronzes, a massive and monumental group of work. I took the suggestion of my neighbor, Patricia Faure, and set the dinner up in her space—just to the east of the gallery. We had 100 guests—far more than originally planned, but a truly significant group of people who had known Peter during the previous five decades. As usual, the late Henry Hopkins (who had known Voulkos since the 1950s in Los Angeles as well as the 70s and 80s in San Francisco) served as the toastmaster. Guests ranging from Frank and Berta Gehry to Sid Felsen and Joni Weyl gathered to honor the legendary Voulkos.

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Another dinner was just under 50 people, honoring artist Larry Bell in February, 2008. Larry was kind enough to talk about his show of new works on paper, and our guests were treated to a fabulous sit-down dinner. We had the honor of hosting the Director of MOCA, Jeremy Strick and his wife, as well as many of Larry’s oldest friends, including Stanley and Elyse Grinstein and John Mason. Among the others were collectors and curators, all seated in a refined and elegant setting amidst the luminous new collages.

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More recently, we co-hosted a dinner honoring Ed Moses, during his 2010 exhibition. Ed invited some of his long-time friends, and we invited some of his long-term supporters. This time, the connections made at the dinner resulted in the placement of a Moses painting at a museum! For this event we moved the feast next door, but still the style remained—a kind of transformation of the gallery space into a small and intimate private restaurant. It’s that kind of personal experience, and sense of community, that makes the art world rewarding.

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Written by Frank Lloyd

February 15, 2013 at 12:09 am

Education at the Gallery

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Henry and AdrianI’ve written before about some of the educational programs we’ve presented at the gallery. Last time, I used a big yellow school bus as the illustration, and wrote about a couple of gallery talks by experts. But this week I had a chance to review some of the many other programs.

In the past ten years, speakers have presented gallery walk-throughs, interviews have been conducted, and conversations between artists have been recorded. This public service has been intended to provide a forum for discussion and a resource for the art community of Los Angeles.

The gallery also offered a class on art collecting that Larry Bell Hunter talk copycomprised of a series of talks, titled “The First Class, Parts One and Two”. Speakers came from the museum world, such as the late Henry Hopkins, Director of the UCLA Hammer Museum, and Charlotte Eyerman, former curator at the Getty Museum. Highly recognized journalists, including Suzanne Muchnic, staff art writer at the Los Angeles Times for 3 decades, and Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, author of biographies on Georgia O’Keefe and Craig Kauffman, gave lectures.

Berlant Lecture 005 copy2We have also hosted exhibition walk-throughs by artists, as well as conversations between artists and journalists. One very memorable event was a conversation between Tony Berlant and Tony Marsh, both admirers of the ancient work of the Mimbres potters. By guiding art enthusiasts through the exhibition and engaging with them in discussion about the works on display, the artists that have participated in our walk-throughs and conversations contribute to the educational mission of the gallery.

Written by Frank Lloyd

January 17, 2013 at 1:51 am